Artist rendering 1940s
Artist rendering 1940s
Photo taken in 2015
Photo taken in 2015
Photo taken in 2015
Photo taken in 2015
Artist rendering
Artist rendering
Photo taken in 2015
Photo taken in 2015

Click to enlarge

Artist rendering 1940s
Photo taken in 2015
Photo taken in 2015
Artist rendering
Photo taken in 2015

Schilling Building

Address: 238 NE Third Street
Construction Date: 1884
Current Business: La Rambla Restaurant
Historic Name/Use: Schilling Building
Significance: Primary Significance
Style of Architecture: Italianate

1884–1892: Boss Saloon

1892–1911: Saloon (name unknown)

1911–1921: Grocery Store

1920s: Variety Store

ca. 1950s and 1960s: Sears Roebuck

ca. 1977: Stitch and Post

Present day: La Rambla Restaurant             

Built in 1884, this two-story Italianate brick building originally housed various saloons until 1911, when it became a grocery store. John Shilling purchased the building in 1905 and covered the brick with stucco. He also added the parapet with his name and the date of his purchase. In the mid 1920s it was home to the first Rutherford’s Variety store. Aluminum framed storefront windows and a painted metal marquee were added. Sears Roebuck occupied this building during the 1950s and 1960s.

In 2002, the non-historically sensitive updates were removed, and the building was restored to its turn-of-the century glory by its current owner Kathy Stoler.  It is home to La Rambla Restaurant with a wonderful loft apartment above that is available as a vacation rental. This could very possibly be the oldest standing brick building on Third Street. 

Primary Significant Contributing: Structures are classified as Primary Significant if they were built in or before 1912, or reflect the building styles, traditions, or patterns of structures typically constructed before this date. These buildings represent the primary period of construction and development in downtown McMinnville from initial settlement in 1881 to 1912, when city improvements and use of the Oregon Electric and Southern Pacific Railroad service promoted new construction in the downtown area.

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